Topic: Your squad

Amanda & Jeremy

Nurturing your child's dreams

Asher was infatuated with superheroes when he was little. He could not get enough of superhero action figures or costumes and his affection grew tremendously when he met a “real life” superhero at a local event. Asher was only four years old when he enthusiastically and confidently stated, “A superhero is going to be at my birthday party.”

“And so it began, the parent journey of helping our little human realize his big dreams.”

A most memorable six-year-old life-sized dream came true when we took Asher and his sisters roller-skating. We knew our girls could physically skate, but Asher had never walked independently, let alone rolled on skates. That day at the roller-skating rink, Asher did not sit on the sidelines or sit in his wheelchair because he had bigger plans. So, with a lot of help from the business owner and a lot of muscle power from dad, Asher literally skated.

Recently, we watched a show where a main character was announced valedictorian. Asher, now almost eight years old, immediately asked what it meant to be a valedictorian. When the word was defined for him, he said without hesitation, “I want to be a valedictorian.” To which I replied, “I bet you will be, buddy.”

The same way we figured out how to bring a superhero to Asher’s birthday party, or how to help Asher skate, we will figure out how to help Asher become the valedictorian he wants to be.

“We will figure it out together, with encouragement and love.”

And we will welcome those who come along, like that business owner or that “real life” superhero, to help us make Asher’s dreams come true, one dream at a time.

Kevan

Creativity and disability
(part 2)

I remember sitting in a friend’s kitchen a few years ago, talking with him about my future. I saw myself as a writer and wanted to have a go of it as a career. By that time, I’d written a handful of novels, and was in search of opportunities to speak. Sitting at that kitchen table, my friend gently said to me, “You have a story to tell, Kevan. It’s right in front of you.” He had been close to my parents since before I was born. He had walked with our family through my diagnosis, and every hill and valley since then.

“He saw my story better than I could see it myself.”

Up to that point in my life, I would get so annoyed when people suggested I tell my story of life with SMA. I wanted to be known for my talents, not my disability, and turning the spotlight on it seemed like giving up in that fight. Even when that friend said it, I bucked a bit, but he was right. He wasn’t telling me to sell out. He was pointing out that for all my efforts to share deep things with the world, I had my most profound story sitting right there in my lap the whole time and had adamantly chosen to ignore it.

But I still had a hitch in this proposal. Everyone wanted me to share about my life with disability, but I had trouble finding the best angle for it, the right voice, the driving narrative. That’s when my friends and I did something ridiculous. We decided to leave my wheelchair home, head to Europe, and just see how it went.

“Suddenly, and actually without meaning to, I had a very clear story to tell, and a starting point from which to launch the bigger story of my life with disability.”

I know not everyone reading this is a writer or musician. But the principles remain because, ultimately, it’s all storytelling. As we pursue our various creative endeavors as people with disabilities, let us keep a few things in mind:

  1. Be sure you have a story, something poignant for people to pay attention to. Don’t just go around shouting, “Listen to me because I have a disease!” That is literally everyone’s story (we’re all disabled somehow), so find your unique angle.
  2. Be aware of your audience’s needs and interests in the details of your story. Art is a conversation, so exercise that. Only spend time on how you tie your shoelaces if that’s something your audience wants to know. Ask. They’ll tell you.
  3. Be tasteful in two ways. First, how explicitly you tell your story (varies by audience, refer to #1). Second, don’t beat a dead horse. Share your story, don’t preach guilt or pity. There’s enough of that in the world already.

Have fun!

Alex

Finding my why

2020 was hard on all of us.

The pandemic.
The fear.
The new lives we’re living.

For disabled people, the pandemic is reaffirming embedded ableist views in our society. It weighs heavy on my mental health, as I’m sure it does for the entire disability community.

I’ve always approached life with a “can-do” attitude. I told myself that my disability and society’s ignorance about disability would not stop me from living the life I want to live.

“I can’t control others, but I can control myself.”

My feelings.
My life.

I think this rings true, especially during the pandemic and this time of uncertainty that we are all experiencing.

To keep my mind on track and continue on the journey I’m on of living my best life, I find ways to remind myself of the good.

I follow writers and creators who inspire me with their words. I find solace in relatability and human interaction. The innate human need to connect with others and feel seen is something we all desire. Even if they aren’t disabled, I can relate to their stories and that human connection keeps me grounded.

Another thing I do to keep myself grounded amid the chaos of living a life with a disability--where something can change at the drop of a hat--is to pursue what inspires me. To create. I can’t tell you how many screenshots I have on my phone of things I come across while mindlessly scrolling that inspires me to create something, write something, or do something new.

“What I have to give back is my creativity.”

In college, I studied rehabilitation services. In short, that involves working with people who have disabilities and providing education and services to help them live independent lives, in order to arm our clients with the knowledge to be successful – however they define success. This job gave me purpose. It gave me a creative outlet to give back to my community.

I find having a network of people who are supporting me and being able to use my creativity as an emotional outlet is what keeps me sane.

Life is messy, and disability is not excluded. If anything, disability makes life more messy.

My grandmother always used to say, “A dirty kid is a happy kid.” I found it to be extremely true, even in my adulthood.

Life is messy, whether figuratively or literally, and that’s the best part. We never know what to expect. And this has been a year of the unexpected.

We are growing, learning and evolving.

Resilience comes in many forms, but I think finding what brings it out within oneself is what the best part of the journey is. For me, this was finding my purpose, my job, where I can help others.

“Finding my purpose gave me a ‘why.’ Having a why means everything to me.”

Kevan

Joy in the journey

I recently had the pleasure of meeting John Morris, a fellow world traveler and founder of wheelchairtravel.org. John and I are not dissimilar in our needs, namely the use of wheelchairs, and though we each approach travel differently in some ways, the core of our experiences is the same.

One topic that came up in our conversation was that of perspectives. We could swap stories all day about the difficulties of travel, especially in light of the recent health pandemic. But that’s not what we reminisce about.

“Our memories rest in the wonder of our adventures.”

I asked John how he maintains that positive outlook on travel. This is where our difference of approach comes into play, because I travel with a group of friends, while John goes solo.

In the pragmatic sense, a lot of my own positive outlook is bolstered by those I surround myself with. I can look on the bright side, but man, it really helps to have folks around me doing the same. John, however, is traveling alone, so his answer? “I try to focus on keeping a cool head with respect to the inconveniences of travel. Air travel, for example, can be quite uncomfortable and frustrating... but by leaving that frustration at the airport, I am able to better focus on the joy in the destination and the purpose of travel.”

“I couldn't help but agree; keeping a cool head is paramount.”

We can’t control those around us, and we aren’t always in control of our circumstances, but what we can control is our attitude toward it. I much prefer to focus on the joys of a journey than the (albeit inevitable) difficulties – not just looking back on the memory of it, but as I am experiencing it in the moment. As I mentioned before, part of how I do that is by the company I keep – that they be of a similar mind. It helps me regulate my “head coolness.” So, I had to ask, “As an independent traveler, what is a practical way you regulate, stay cool-headed and enjoy the journey? You mentioned the example of leaving your frustrations at the airport – how do you do that?”

To this, John made a great point. “It is through an understanding that there is a time and place to deal with conflict. If there is an issue with air travel that cannot be immediately resolved, it is best to address that through the appropriate channels at a convenient time. In nearly all cases, the appropriate time would not be to interfere with the very reason I have traveled. Save that work for after the journey, if possible.”

This is applicable, not only to travel, but to everyday life. Difficulties arise left and right, but they don’t have to ruin everything.

“Adopt a positive outlook by leaving those frustrations ‘at the airport,’ to deal with later and enjoy the rest of what’s in front of you.”

I believe, by doing this, you’ll discover a world of wonder and joy.

Kevan

Finding my passion
through travel

A few years ago, some friends and I set out on a trip around parts of Europe. Our destinations wouldn’t be accessible, not in the traditional sense. We wanted to climb the stairs of old cathedrals, dance on cobblestone streets, hike through countrysides and up mountains to ancient monasteries. It was all deemed impossible for wheelchairs, so we left mine behind and took a custom backpack, instead, for these guys to carry me. Our drive, at the time, was just to be together and have fun as a group of goofy friends, but the way we had to do it led to a greater need being revealed. As we returned home from the trip, opportunities presented themselves to interact with other families with disabilities.

“Through this experience, I learned the beauty of enriching the lives of others.”

The joy of inspiring and encouraging these families! That joy far outweighs any thrill of my own exploration, and it leaves a lasting impact upon, not just my heart, but the whole world around me. In one of my favorite movies, the main character talks about how he has realized courage is what interests him most. This is exactly what I’ve learned about myself in this wildly unexpected season of life.

My true adventure is serving you and you and you! My interest is in helping others to find courage and pursue it, to ultimately make the world a better place. It’s a matter of seeing a need and filling it as best I can with the resources I have around me.

Take a look around in your own life. Where is there a need, what is the need and how can you fulfill it? It may or may not have to do with disability – not in the traditional sense anyway.

“The world is full of needs, and we can all pitch in to fulfill them.”

If you have SMA or are close to someone with SMA, chances are your life is full of unique perspectives and approaches to the world. Can these help to fulfill needs and enrich the lives of others? If so, let’s go! Get those ideas and creations out there. Don’t be afraid, don’t grip them too tightly and don’t assume it’s the fix-all. Ask others for help and advice to make the ideas happen, be willing to collaborate, and then get the word out that you see the need and you have an option that may be helpful.

Amanda & Jeremy

I am stronger
because of my son

I find myself around mile 30 of a 50-mile, seven-night trek on the Jon Muir trail in the high Sierra Nevada mountains.

How did I get here?

I’m the model of a modern, domesticated husband and father. Admittedly, groomed for the finer and simpler things of life. Nevertheless, here I am.

Today, I’m mentally broken, dodging mosquitoes and longing for home. “Only” 20 more miles. “Only” two more nights. I miss my family terribly. I want my bed and a shower. An egg sandwich with coffee sounds delightful.

“But the only way home is the same way I got here—one step at a time.”

As I surrender my thoughts to the reality that there is no quick or easy way home, I can’t help but think about my son’s journey with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Every day, I watch my son tackle simple living tasks as if he were scaling a mountain. He has no easy way in this life; yet, he tackles every challenge without hesitation, taking one step at a time.

I’ve wanted to cry since the start of my hiking trip from mental fatigue and physical exhaustion, but tonight the tears finally roll down my face.

“Each tear confesses that what I have previously defined to be difficult as a 21st century man does not compare to what I am experiencing as I scale this earth and it certainly doesn’t compare to the challenges my son faces.”

As I reflect on my son’s steadfast and hard-earned strength, I am able to conjure the courage and perseverance to overcome my newfound brokenness. I can wipe away my tears and push on, knowing I am stronger because of my son.

Brianna

When your caregiver is your
dad and your best friend

My dad and I can talk without talking. All I have to do is grunt, or quirk a brow, or wrinkle my nose, and my dad is on his merry way. We often joke that we have spent too much time together. If we can read each other’s mind, something’s got to give, if only to preserve our sanity.

“My dad is my best friend.
But he is also my caregiver.”

I live in his house. I eat his food and am responsible for probably 50 percent of our household’s electricity bill. Approximately three times a night, he drags himself out of bed to adjust me in my bed. Sometimes he gives me, his grown daughter, a shower.

Our situation is complex, to say the least. It’s infuriating, but also life-giving, and is a relationship that defies categorization. How do you explain to your therapist that, yes, your dad drives you out of your mind, but he is also one of the few things keeping you alive?

Boundaries are a buzzword these days – interpersonal rules, limits or guidelines that keep relationships healthy. Without boundaries, you’re a dog with no leash, digging under fences and crossing roads at peak traffic times. Without boundaries, you will either burn out or get hurt.

Boundaries are crucial in caregiving relationships, especially when your caregiver plays a dual role. Imagine if your best friend from high school was also your professional caregiver. What would you do if they didn’t show up for work one morning? As their friend, you might be tempted to let it slide. But as their “employer,” you expect them to be accountable, dependable, like any other employee. In this scenario, boundaries would delineate what is and is not acceptable. You might say, “I value your friendship, but I expect you to take responsibility for your actions and treat this like any other paying job.”

Now imagine that your best friend and caregiver is also your dad. How do you navigate that conversation?

It’s not easy. I won’t pretend that I’m an expert. But it helps to acknowledge that boundaries are hard, no matter the situation. It will always feel a little bit uncomfortable, like you’re overstepping in some necessary way.

I always seem to have boundary conversations around our dining table. My feet are in my mom’s lap, my dad is sitting to my left, and I’m staring at a half-empty plate of chicken and mashed potatoes. If history is anything to go by, I’m crying and feeling stuck between adolescence and adulthood because I need my parents more than most people my age.

I leave these conversations feeling wretched. My parents are my best friends. We’re closer than we probably should be. The last thing I want to do is complicate our lives by drawing a line in the sand and saying, “I’m still your daughter, but I’m also an adult. We need to work together, so I can start acting like one.”

“It takes vulnerability to ask for what you need and courage to believe in your ability to compromise.”

But I can say from experience that parents need boundaries, too. Starting the conversation is hard but worth it. Ultimately, you all benefit.

Amanda & Jeremy

Supporting siblings:
our personal tips

As a parent, I have finite time to nurture my children. This is true regardless of having a disabled son, who naturally requires more of my time for his physical and medical needs.

“How I nurture each child in my finite time matters; that’s why being intentional is so important.”

It’s difficult to give each child individualized attention when they are often together, but I find expressing my attention in small ways makes a big difference. My middle daughter loves to hold my hand. Even when I’m with all my children, if I ask to hold her hand, she can sense my attention and love directed specifically to her. Although subtle, my simple intentional action is noticed in her little heart.

Individual time for each child is sacred, so the time deserves to be called something special. When I’m out with one of my daughters, I call it a “mommy-daughter date.” Highlighting the one-on-one time with a special name helps my daughter recognize the dedicated time just for her. Even if the time together is short, the impact is eternal in my daughter’s heart.

It’s important that my daughters recognize that their brother also needs to be nurtured and have quality time, beyond what’s necessary for his medical care. Just like them, he gets “mommy-son dates” too. Just like them, there are specific ways I intentionally express attention and love to him.

Being intentional helps me nurture well, regardless of who needs more of my time.

“Sometimes it’s just as simple as quality versus quantity. Giving my best in the little time I have with each of them.”

Kevan

Fostering independence
in your children (part 1)

My sister and I grew up in an amazing home. We have an older brother and a mom and dad who, my mentor would say, “forgot to tell us we were handicapped.”

“We both have SMA Type 2, but our
lives have been full and wonderful.”

Looking back now, I can attribute that to the choices our parents made to foster within us senses of worth, awareness and ingenuity. When I asked mom and dad about these choices, they shared with me some keys to their methods of raising kids with disabilities. Here are a few tips from their perspective:

  1. Not All Danger Is Bad: Adventure is life-giving to kids. Scraped knees and broken arms teach them not only their limitations, but their abilities too. For a child with weak lungs, feeble limbs, or a wheelchair, this will look different from other kids. My brother climbed a tree and jumped in an attempt to fly. I couldn’t do that, but I could circle the roller rink with thirty other people a lot bigger and faster than me, and I could play soccer with my running friends on a bumpy Carolina field. There are foolish dangers, like driving your chair into a pond, and then there are dangers that come naturally with living life to the fullest. The latter should be allowed, and as parents, you will need to accept that your child might get hurt but they’ll grow as a person and ultimately be the better for it.
  2. Let Them Feel Deeply: Growing up is hard in its own right, but then compounding it with a disability makes for a childhood of unbelievable dynamics that many able-bodied adults may never face. Special friendships and broken hearts, cool gadgets and surprise surgeries. It’s a lot to take in. Kids have a profound capacity to feel. They should learn how, and be allowed, to handle those ocean waves of joy, sorrow, love, anger, confusion, etc. As they encounter the world around them, the good and the bad of it, their hearts are tender to the impression it makes. Don’t shelter them from this, but come alongside to help them step into these thoughts and feelings, and navigate such experiences properly to come out on the other end with a healthier, fuller spirit.
  3. Rebellion Is Not Their Disability: Discipline is important for a child learning how to interact with the world. It clarifies boundaries, which at an early age we test to understand. I learned early on that I can’t backtalk my mom or disobey my dad. I’m in a wheelchair, which means I am an exception to some rules, like extended time on exams or having someone else do my laundry, but I’m not exempt from respecting my fellow man and observing the law of the land.

So much of who we grow up to be is derived from the people who raise us, the world they shape around us, and the ways they help us navigate through that world.

“It’s those daily decisions to be present in the good and bad, and to nurture in your child, by example, the depths and value of life, regardless of disabilities.”

My tip: Look for people who are empathetic to help you get what you need for your child. When someone tells you no or demonstrates an unwillingness to help, move on to another individual. Instead of trying to change a person’s mind, look for the right person to help.

Kevan

Fostering independence
in your children (part 2)

Raising children with disabilities looks an awful lot like raising able-bodied children. At least, it can with the right tools and mindset. My parents raised three children, and two of us have SMA Type 2. They made important decisions daily to help navigate our interactions with the world around us.

“By this, we grew up learning how to have rich experiences with our communities and each other.”

In follow-up to my previous article, here are a few more tips from my mom and dad sharing their perspective on how they raised children with disabilities.

  1. Open Door Policies: An open heart is vital for you and your child to survive. Get your family out into the community and have people in your home, too. This breaks down the walls that come up when people don’t understand your family’s circumstances. Letting people into your world can hurt, but it can also be rewarding in the most beautiful ways you wouldn’t expect. We were not meant to carry burdens on our own, nor to celebrate without a party. This will help you to have support, and it will help your child to experience community, how to foster and engage it alike, which will prove invaluable as they set out on their own later in life.
  2. Relatable Moral Support: Not only is it important to assimilate your family into everyday community experiences, but on top of that, find a few other families with comparable challenges to your own. This will help you, your spouse and children all feel a better sense that you’re not alone in this different kind of life. Interacting with the outside world is paramount, but you also just need, sometimes, to hear someone say, “I get it.”
  3. There’s Always Another Way: As your family runs into obstacles, take advantage of these opportunities to foster innovation, creativity, and flexibility by example. I heard a story recently of a family who uses this motto, “There’s always another way!” If you and your family have dreams that seem impossible, work together and think outside the box to find a way. Traveling, picnicking, camping, whatever it may be, it will be encouraging to you, your children, and those around you to accomplish it in your own unique way. And it may be difficult, or take a lot of time and trial and error, but your family is worth figuring it out for, aren’t they? Growing up, my family found the wildest solutions to the weirdest dreams, and now as an adult, I travel the world in a backpack carried by my friends!
“Your choices now as a parent will help
shape who your child grows up to be.”

Do you want them to be free, to have friends, see the world, be a writer, lawyer, scientist, spouse, parent, contribute to society, change the world? At the end of the day, the most important thing is for them to know you love them, and these steps can help in the details of what that looks like.

Amanda & Jeremy

Navigating Life as an
Interabled Family

An interabled family poses for a portrait on sidewalk in front of a brick building.

We navigate life as an interabled family in a moment-by-moment way.

“As parents, we recognize our limitations and that sometimes we can’t do it all, so we don’t try.”

We do what we can, when we can; but, more often than not, we choose fewer activities and fewer people. This forces us to be deliberate and be intentional with whom and how we spend our time.

We spend time with people who recognize our life runs at a different pace. People who consider accommodations so our disabled son, Asher, can be included in activities. People who are willing to help when things are hard. These are the people who won’t be bothered by coming to our house instead of a park when it’s the best accessible option. These are the people who will swing by on a moment’s notice to pick up our daughters, so they are not stuck at home when their brother is sick. These are the people who understand we can’t always do it on our own, and they are willing to be our village.

Our family ebbs and flows based on Asher’s health. When he is doing well, we are full steam ahead. This is when we register the children for a special activity in the community, we take a spontaneous family trip or we try something new. When Asher gets sick, everything slows down, sometimes to a standstill. We try to divide and conquer when possible to maintain activities for our daughters, but at the same time, we’ve learned that slowing down is a team effort, and as a family, we are in it together.

Activities often require a delicate balancing act. Asher usually needs modifications or extra assistance to participate in activities. Many times, his sisters want to do things that their brother can’t do. In spite of these challenges, we often celebrate our parental victories when we make the impossible possible. But there are times we help our children understand our limitations or their limitations literally make some things impossible to do. Limitations are hard for children to accept, but it helps to reframe their mindset to think about all the times and ways they have and will push past the immediate limitation.

“As parents, we accept that it’s okay to teach our children that they can’t always do everything and yes, in fact, “no” is an answer.”

It’s not always easy to tell how our children are navigating through our interabled family life. We catch glimpses that show us they are doing just fine. Like the moment at a friend’s house when Asher’s sister pushes chairs out of the way to make room for his wheelchair. Or the moment Asher celebrates his sister’s accomplishment for something that he will never be able to do himself. These moments help our hearts rest a little easier. But it’s when we are sitting around the dinner table telling jokes or snuggled up in bed watching a family movie that we know the simplest and sweetest moments are the keys to their hearts – no matter what life they are navigating.

Shane & Hannah

Saying Goodbye to Sorry

Many of us living with SMA can identify with a recurring pattern of thought that I have named my “Burden Complex.” It’s an idea that I’ve written about at length, but I believe it’s such a common part of growing up with SMA that it’s worth mentioning again.

“My Burden Complex was simple: growing up, from the ages of about 10 to 25, there were times when asking for help from others created a feeling of immense guilt within me.”

I felt like I was bothering people. I felt like I needed to minimize my needs in order to be less of a burden to my loved ones around me. It wasn’t a constant feeling, but it was certainly hard to deal with when it did arise. These challenging emotions caused me to repeat a similar phrase when asking for help, “I’m sorry, but…”

“I’m sorry, but could I have another sip of my drink?”

“I’m sorry, but could I use the bathroom?”

My apologies were often met with the same reaction. My loved ones or friends would say, “You don’t need to be sorry, I’m happy to help!” Still, this constant reassurance did very little to alleviate my burdensome feelings.

It wasn’t until I met (and fell madly in love with) my fiancée, Hannah, that I was able to truly say goodbye to saying sorry. With a seemingly simple question, Hannah helped me better understand my Burden Complex, and thus, move on from it.

The conversation went something like this…

“Hey Hannah, sorry but can you grab me a snack?”

“Sure, my handsome and intelligent and funny Shane, but you don’t need to apologize. You know I love helping you.”

“I know, but what if you’re just saying that because it would be mean not to say it?” (This was a classic way that my Burden Complex would negate the reassurances from others.)

“Do you enjoy being my boyfriend?”

“What? Yes, obviously.”

“But what if you’re just saying that to be nice?”

“Of course I’m not! I love you!”

“Do you see how that feels? To be questioned about something that you obviously mean whole-heartedly?”

“And just like that, it clicked. I would never lie to Hannah about my feelings towards her, so why would I question her reassurances about my Burden Complex?”

This is obviously a simplification of a healing process that takes time. Even today, I have moments where I catch myself thinking of myself as a burden. But by stopping myself from apologizing for every request and reminding myself that loved ones have no reason to lie about their willingness to help me, I’ve made great progress in seeing myself and my needs in a healthier way.

Kevan

Debunking Myths Around
Socializing with a Disability

Kevan smiling in a room with wooden floors and tables.

When I’m not traveling, I spend most of my days at my local coffee shop in downtown Fort Wayne, Indiana. Sometimes, it’s bursting at the seams with patrons coming and going and sometimes, I’m the only person there besides the baristas. Over the past six years, I’ve met writers and artists, lawyers, priests, corporate moguls, politicians and touring bands who haven’t showered in three weeks. I’ve met college kids, homeless people, delivery guys, blue collars and nine-to-fivers.

“All the while, I’m the same ol’ Kevan they meet, with SMA and an insatiable love for being with people.”

I get to see the various ways people respond to me socially, and how I respond to them; I get to witness firsthand the many myths about being social with a disability, both externally and internally; and I get to experience the intensive work and immense joy of debunking those various myths. I want to focus, in this article, on two myths in particular, and clarify that these two myths are the result of expectations—and thereby, the mutual responsibilities—of our able-bodied and disabled communities alike.

  1. “All of my friends should help me.” Having a disability is tricky because you have unusually practical needs, they need to be met, and that’s just life. You’re so used to having these needs that finding ways to fulfill them is second nature to you by now. So, why shouldn’t it be second nature to all of your friends, too? A myth that folks with disabilities often fall prey to is that everyone in your life should participate in helping with those needs. And I see how we get there. It makes sense if that’s your everyday life. It’s my everyday life. Folks on the able-bodied side of this conversation fall prey to it, too, and run away at that ominous mountain of expectation. Can you blame them?
  2. “None of my friends should help me.” There’s another end to this issue, which is the assumption that no one can help you, should help you, or even wants to help you. Personal care, food prep, doors and jackets; all of that is your nurse’s job or your parents’ responsibility. Friends are friends, and we expect them to be there just to laugh and watch movies with. What a miserable myth to live under, though. And when this is your mindset, no one knows your needs, so then they assume there’s nothing for them to help with. The relationship remains shallow, stagnant, and unsatisfying for everyone involved.

Rich social experiences come from balancing vulnerability and awareness. Some friends will be closer than others, some will help in ways others won’t, some won’t physically help at all and that’s just fine. Make your needs known tastefully and sensibly as they arise and as those around you seem willing (qualification is another myth we can address later).

“The key is to see people—truly see them—and let the value of your relationship be deeper than whether or not they help you with your wedgie.”

Kevan

Five Ways to Make Your
World Accessible

I grew up in North Carolina, where every road is long, every hill is steep, and nearly every house has stairs.

The church I grew up in had two levels, both accessible as long as you rounded the property outside. My elementary and middle schools were the same.

And there are ramps, automatic doors, sometimes elevators with buttons you can reach.

“Accommodations do exist, and are helpful, but what I find most effective is when my aim to achieve accessibility happens from the inside out.”

The following are five interpersonal ways to make your world more accessible.

  1. Community
    Having friends and family around you is paramount. A devoted care team to support you, whether two people or twenty, will afford you more freedom to live life without the stress of figuring it out on your own. Suddenly, there’s no need to ask whether there’s an automatic door or if the bus system is up to snuff. You don’t have to order food based solely on whether it needs to be cut up or worry if the handicap row in the movie theater will be available. The possibilities are endless when people work together.
  2. Flexibility
    I have a handful of guys who take turns coming to get me up in the morning. They are all volunteers, which is awesome, but they can do that because they have other jobs, so to enjoy their help, I need to be flexible with their schedules. Some arrive at 6:30 to get me up before work, others come at 9:30 because they worked late the night before.When making plans for my day, I keep it loose and fluid, free to fluctuate my own life according to the lives of those around me.
  3. Ingenuity
    Another aspect to flexibility is ingenuity, looking at an evolving situation and finding ways to change with it.One of my favorite memories with this is when my friends and I used to have a weekly potluck together. It always happened at a different person’s house, so I never knew what I would find by way of accessibility. But my friends and I assessed and worked it out. Sometimes that meant building ramps, sometimes it meant them carrying me in without my wheelchair, but it was always creative, fun, and successful.
  4. Simplicity
    Something I’ve learned and ended up loving is my need to simplify life. Over the years, I’ve become a bit of a minimalist because that means less for me (and thus my care team) to keep track of, physically and mentally, leaving room for what matters most. All my clothes, for example, match (and I don’t have a lot of them), so that whoever’s getting me up in the morning can just grab whatever from the closet.I already have enough legitimate needs to address, why add unnecessary details to the pile? It’s amazing to see how accessible the world becomes when you’re less demanding of it.
  5. Community
    Returning to community, it’s not just about your care team, but about your care for them as well.Relationships grow when both parties pour into it. While you have needs, so does everyone else around you, whether obvious or not. This is your chance to give back, and your care for others may build your community, both in numbers and depth, and thus as you work together, the world becomes more accessible for everyone involved.
“Accessibility, in the end, comes from folks putting others first and working together to find creative solutions. This involves thoughtfulness and sacrifice on both sides of the conversation. But the result is beautiful: a world physically more accessible, but also more loving.”

Alex

Being Honest. Being Open.
Being Social.