Inspiring stories from those living with SMA, ranging from topics of accessibility, dating, individuality, work and adulting.

Alex

Accessibility is a right

Navigating a world that wasn’t made to be accessible can be taxing. The extra planning, the coordinating, the calling ahead to see if there’s accessible seating — sometimes it seems like a chore just to go anywhere.

Being denied the opportunity to go out with friends or family because the establishment is not accessible, or not being able to apply for your dream job because the location isn’t accessible.

If you have SMA or a disability, I’m sure you know this all too well.

“Accessibility is a fundamental human need; a human right.”

It can be tough hearing people’s excitement when a place does turn out to be accessible, as if it’s an add-on — something extra.

I’m guilty of feeling “thankful” when a place I went to just happened to be wheelchair accessible. It wasn’t until recently I discovered that the feeling of thankfulness I experienced when I was presented with access stemmed from deep-rooted internalized ableism. This is something we all have to continue to work on, whether we are disabled or not. The work begins with education, awareness and storytelling.

“Through sharing my own experiences, I hope to culminate an anti-ableist society: a society where disabled folks can have access to everything our peers do.”

Accessibility is nothing to be thankful for, because it’s a human right.

Yes, accessibility is a human right, not a privilege.

Kevan

Creativity and disability
(part 1)

I have been writing books for the better part of ten years now, and before that I played in a band. Having SMA, I’ve always caught people off guard with my subject matter.

“It’s been an uphill battle to sing and write about anything but disabilities.”

There is nothing wrong with creating material related to disability, but as an artist, I personally had other things I identified with and wanted to talk about in my avenues of creativity.

My band sang songs and made references to movies, literature, other bands, our short attention spans, and our inability to get girlfriends. It baffled our audiences that we didn’t talk more about the elephant in the room: my wheelchair, whether for awareness or humor. But we were college kids with other things on our minds... like pizza.

When I started writing books, I wanted to tell stories about pirates, time travelers, and zombies. I would include characters with disabilities, because they fit the narrative, but they weren’t the focus. And most folks who read those books said, “These are great, but what about more on the guy in the wheelchair? I want to hear more about him!”

These are tensions faced by every artist, regardless of whether or not they have a disability. It’s hard for most of the world to see past your sore thumb.

“There is so much more to you than a 400 lb wheelchair, and those other parts of you need outlets, too.”

As an artist (of whatever medium), I encourage you to push through. Get creative with how you navigate creativity. A common joke in filmmaking is that you make a film for you and then a film for “them,” meaning there are times when you take creative license to make what you want and times when you give in to make what is expected of you by others. Strike a balance between the two, which might involve striking a balance between your pride and humility, or your freedom and discipline.

“Art is definitely expression, but it’s also a sharing of experience, so it’s a wrestling match of being for you and others.”

Two years ago, I finally published a memoir of my life with SMA, and have received quite a bit of attention for it. I’ve been glad, as I grow in my craft, to share such a story, but I’m also now navigating how to not get “pigeonholed” as a disabled writer.

In the following two articles, we will explore both routes: producing creative material related to your disability, and producing creative material unrelated to your disability. Doing both is possible, and I would actually suggest it, but ultimately, the aforementioned balance is yours to establish with yourself and your audience. And whatever that balance ends up looking like for you, always strive to be honest in your expressions and endeavors.

Amanda & Jeremy

Nurturing your child's dreams

Asher was infatuated with superheroes when he was little. He could not get enough of superhero action figures or costumes and his affection grew tremendously when he met a “real life” superhero at a local event. Asher was only four years old when he enthusiastically and confidently stated, “A superhero is going to be at my birthday party.”

“And so it began, the parent journey of helping our little human realize his big dreams.”

A most memorable six-year-old life-sized dream came true when we took Asher and his sisters roller-skating. We knew our girls could physically skate, but Asher had never walked independently, let alone rolled on skates. That day at the roller-skating rink, Asher did not sit on the sidelines or sit in his wheelchair because he had bigger plans. So, with a lot of help from the business owner and a lot of muscle power from dad, Asher literally skated.

Recently, we watched a show where a main character was announced valedictorian. Asher, now almost eight years old, immediately asked what it meant to be a valedictorian. When the word was defined for him, he said without hesitation, “I want to be a valedictorian.” To which I replied, “I bet you will be, buddy.”

The same way we figured out how to bring a superhero to Asher’s birthday party, or how to help Asher skate, we will figure out how to help Asher become the valedictorian he wants to be.

“We will figure it out together, with encouragement and love.”

And we will welcome those who come along, like that business owner or that “real life” superhero, to help us make Asher’s dreams come true, one dream at a time.

Kevan

Creativity and disability
(part 2)

I remember sitting in a friend’s kitchen a few years ago, talking with him about my future. I saw myself as a writer and wanted to have a go of it as a career. By that time, I’d written a handful of novels, and was in search of opportunities to speak. Sitting at that kitchen table, my friend gently said to me, “You have a story to tell, Kevan. It’s right in front of you.” He had been close to my parents since before I was born. He had walked with our family through my diagnosis, and every hill and valley since then.

“He saw my story better than I could see it myself.”

Up to that point in my life, I would get so annoyed when people suggested I tell my story of life with SMA. I wanted to be known for my talents, not my disability, and turning the spotlight on it seemed like giving up in that fight. Even when that friend said it, I bucked a bit, but he was right. He wasn’t telling me to sell out. He was pointing out that for all my efforts to share deep things with the world, I had my most profound story sitting right there in my lap the whole time and had adamantly chosen to ignore it.

But I still had a hitch in this proposal. Everyone wanted me to share about my life with disability, but I had trouble finding the best angle for it, the right voice, the driving narrative. That’s when my friends and I did something ridiculous. We decided to leave my wheelchair home, head to Europe, and just see how it went.

“Suddenly, and actually without meaning to, I had a very clear story to tell, and a starting point from which to launch the bigger story of my life with disability.”

I know not everyone reading this is a writer or musician. But the principles remain because, ultimately, it’s all storytelling. As we pursue our various creative endeavors as people with disabilities, let us keep a few things in mind:

  1. Be sure you have a story, something poignant for people to pay attention to. Don’t just go around shouting, “Listen to me because I have a disease!” That is literally everyone’s story (we’re all disabled somehow), so find your unique angle.
  2. Be aware of your audience’s needs and interests in the details of your story. Art is a conversation, so exercise that. Only spend time on how you tie your shoelaces if that’s something your audience wants to know. Ask. They’ll tell you.
  3. Be tasteful in two ways. First, how explicitly you tell your story (varies by audience, refer to #1). Second, don’t beat a dead horse. Share your story, don’t preach guilt or pity. There’s enough of that in the world already.

Have fun!

Alex

Finding my why

2020 was hard on all of us.

The pandemic.
The fear.
The new lives we’re living.

For disabled people, the pandemic is reaffirming embedded ableist views in our society. It weighs heavy on my mental health, as I’m sure it does for the entire disability community.

I’ve always approached life with a “can-do” attitude. I told myself that my disability and society’s ignorance about disability would not stop me from living the life I want to live.

“I can’t control others, but I can control myself.”

My feelings.
My life.

I think this rings true, especially during the pandemic and this time of uncertainty that we are all experiencing.

To keep my mind on track and continue on the journey I’m on of living my best life, I find ways to remind myself of the good.

I follow writers and creators who inspire me with their words. I find solace in relatability and human interaction. The innate human need to connect with others and feel seen is something we all desire. Even if they aren’t disabled, I can relate to their stories and that human connection keeps me grounded.

Another thing I do to keep myself grounded amid the chaos of living a life with a disability--where something can change at the drop of a hat--is to pursue what inspires me. To create. I can’t tell you how many screenshots I have on my phone of things I come across while mindlessly scrolling that inspires me to create something, write something, or do something new.

“What I have to give back is my creativity.”

In college, I studied rehabilitation services. In short, that involves working with people who have disabilities and providing education and services to help them live independent lives, in order to arm our clients with the knowledge to be successful – however they define success. This job gave me purpose. It gave me a creative outlet to give back to my community.

I find having a network of people who are supporting me and being able to use my creativity as an emotional outlet is what keeps me sane.

Life is messy, and disability is not excluded. If anything, disability makes life more messy.

My grandmother always used to say, “A dirty kid is a happy kid.” I found it to be extremely true, even in my adulthood.

Life is messy, whether figuratively or literally, and that’s the best part. We never know what to expect. And this has been a year of the unexpected.

We are growing, learning and evolving.

Resilience comes in many forms, but I think finding what brings it out within oneself is what the best part of the journey is. For me, this was finding my purpose, my job, where I can help others.

“Finding my purpose gave me a ‘why.’ Having a why means everything to me.”

Kevan

Creativity and disability
(part 3)

Ever since I could form words, I have been telling stories. It is my great passion in life. After college, a friend gave me a novel by a German cartoonist who pretty much broke all the rules of conventional storytelling.

“I remember sitting at my desk, reading this weird book, and I felt the author say to me, ‘You should share your stories with the world, too.’”

That’s when I set out to self-publish my first book, and more followed over the next few years. None of these books had much to do with disability, and it was a constant uphill battle against people’s expectations.

Finally, I wrote a book about my experience with disability and it was picked up by a publisher. I saw this as two opportunities. First, it was certainly a story worth telling and I was happy to do it; second, I was hopeful that it might grow my audience and that audience would then say, “We see your value as a writer. What other stories do you have?” However, the battle continues.

Last summer, I had lunch with a fellow-writer, and we were sharing with one another our latest projects. I told him about the new book I was working on, and mentioned that one of the minor characters was a man with a disability. My friend’s initial response was that I should scrap the rest of the book and refocus my energies on telling that character’s story, with my unique insight on the subject.

I tell you all of this to say that, if you are an artist of any sort with a disability and you don’t want your art to be all about said disability, I understand your desire and I understand your frustration with a world that suggests otherwise. Whether you are a writer, musician, actor, poet, painter, sculptor, basket weaver, whatever, you are more than the disease in your body and your craft has the capacity to express more than the disease in your body, even if a lot of the world is too short-sighted to grasp that.

Every artist deals with this issue of consumers’ expectations.

“Just as you struggle to be seen beyond your disability in your day-to-day, so you will always struggle in the same way with your art.”

But there are people who truly see you—those couple of friends who really get you. And you will find the same to be true with your art. Through the cacophony of people asking about your wheelchair, there will be a voice or two that celebrate your craft simply for what it is. Those couple of voices are more refreshing than you can imagine. If you pay attention to them, you will be revived, inspired, and carried along just fine. So keep an ear out.

Brianna

Working toward
solidarity and equality

We need to hear from people who live at the intersection of multiple identities, but all too often, their voices are suppressed, if not erased, from the narrative.

This is the world we live in. And, unfortunately, the SMA community is not exempt from a variety of “isms” – including racism, sexism, classism, homophobia and transphobia.

So what do we do? How do we practice disability justice in our daily lives, moving beyond equality and diversity – kinds of social activism that, while helpful, address the symptoms of oppression, not the root cause – to solidarity and equity?

“The work begins with humility, and a decision to listen.”

Take an audit of the voices you follow. How many identify as a person of color? How about queer or trans? Is your disability community diverse in background, experiences, culture?

The work begins with a conversation. There are people in our community, and the disability community at large, who have been doing this work for ages, people who are consistently undermined or forgotten.

“They are the voices we should be listening to. Show up, even when it's uncomfortable.”

If you experience any kind of privilege, commit to amplifying the voices of the marginalized. It's not charity. It's solidarity. I would even go so far as to consider it a responsibility.

The work starts right here, right now. So let's get to it.

Kevan

Joy in the journey

I recently had the pleasure of meeting John Morris, a fellow world traveler and founder of wheelchairtravel.org. John and I are not dissimilar in our needs, namely the use of wheelchairs, and though we each approach travel differently in some ways, the core of our experiences is the same.

One topic that came up in our conversation was that of perspectives. We could swap stories all day about the difficulties of travel, especially in light of the recent health pandemic. But that’s not what we reminisce about.

“Our memories rest in the wonder of our adventures.”

I asked John how he maintains that positive outlook on travel. This is where our difference of approach comes into play, because I travel with a group of friends, while John goes solo.

In the pragmatic sense, a lot of my own positive outlook is bolstered by those I surround myself with. I can look on the bright side, but man, it really helps to have folks around me doing the same. John, however, is traveling alone, so his answer? “I try to focus on keeping a cool head with respect to the inconveniences of travel. Air travel, for example, can be quite uncomfortable and frustrating... but by leaving that frustration at the airport, I am able to better focus on the joy in the destination and the purpose of travel.”

“I couldn't help but agree; keeping a cool head is paramount.”

We can’t control those around us, and we aren’t always in control of our circumstances, but what we can control is our attitude toward it. I much prefer to focus on the joys of a journey than the (albeit inevitable) difficulties – not just looking back on the memory of it, but as I am experiencing it in the moment. As I mentioned before, part of how I do that is by the company I keep – that they be of a similar mind. It helps me regulate my “head coolness.” So, I had to ask, “As an independent traveler, what is a practical way you regulate, stay cool-headed and enjoy the journey? You mentioned the example of leaving your frustrations at the airport – how do you do that?”

To this, John made a great point. “It is through an understanding that there is a time and place to deal with conflict. If there is an issue with air travel that cannot be immediately resolved, it is best to address that through the appropriate channels at a convenient time. In nearly all cases, the appropriate time would not be to interfere with the very reason I have traveled. Save that work for after the journey, if possible.”

This is applicable, not only to travel, but to everyday life. Difficulties arise left and right, but they don’t have to ruin everything.

“Adopt a positive outlook by leaving those frustrations ‘at the airport,’ to deal with later and enjoy the rest of what’s in front of you.”

I believe, by doing this, you’ll discover a world of wonder and joy.

Brianna

No one is you and that is
your power

I love all of my art prints, but the one above my desktop monitor has a special place in my heart: “No one is you and that is your power,” usually attributed to singer/songwriter Dave Grohl.

The other day, I was beating myself up over my latest project. The professionals call it imposter syndrome. I was comparing myself to others in my community, writers with book deals and large Twitter followings, feeling like I had nothing to offer. Writing is difficult. Marketing is even harder. Why was I struggling when other people make it look easy? Maybe I wasn’t cut out to be an author after all. Maybe it would be better if I just gave up.

And then I looked up.

No one is you and that is your power.

“I have been carrying stories for a decade, tending to them like I tend to my succulents and house plants.”

Putting them down on paper is hard. I’m sure that publishing them will be equally arduous. But they are still my stories. Mine. And they are bursting at the seams with everything I love, from fairy tales in space to disability representation.

They are not perfect. But they are mine. And therein lies their power. My stories are a curious amalgamation of dreams and experiences. If I do the stories justice and write them well, they won’t look like anyone else’s. They will be flawed and earnest and quintessentially me.

“There is power in that, even if the world—or our inner self talk—says otherwise.”

Kevan

Finding my passion
through travel

A few years ago, some friends and I set out on a trip around parts of Europe. Our destinations wouldn’t be accessible, not in the traditional sense. We wanted to climb the stairs of old cathedrals, dance on cobblestone streets, hike through countrysides and up mountains to ancient monasteries. It was all deemed impossible for wheelchairs, so we left mine behind and took a custom backpack, instead, for these guys to carry me. Our drive, at the time, was just to be together and have fun as a group of goofy friends, but the way we had to do it led to a greater need being revealed. As we returned home from the trip, opportunities presented themselves to interact with other families with disabilities.

“Through this experience, I learned the beauty of enriching the lives of others.”

The joy of inspiring and encouraging these families! That joy far outweighs any thrill of my own exploration, and it leaves a lasting impact upon, not just my heart, but the whole world around me. In one of my favorite movies, the main character talks about how he has realized courage is what interests him most. This is exactly what I’ve learned about myself in this wildly unexpected season of life.

My true adventure is serving you and you and you! My interest is in helping others to find courage and pursue it, to ultimately make the world a better place. It’s a matter of seeing a need and filling it as best I can with the resources I have around me.

Take a look around in your own life. Where is there a need, what is the need and how can you fulfill it? It may or may not have to do with disability – not in the traditional sense anyway.

“The world is full of needs, and we can all pitch in to fulfill them.”

If you have SMA or are close to someone with SMA, chances are your life is full of unique perspectives and approaches to the world. Can these help to fulfill needs and enrich the lives of others? If so, let’s go! Get those ideas and creations out there. Don’t be afraid, don’t grip them too tightly and don’t assume it’s the fix-all. Ask others for help and advice to make the ideas happen, be willing to collaborate, and then get the word out that you see the need and you have an option that may be helpful.

Amanda & Jeremy

I am stronger
because of my son

I find myself around mile 30 of a 50-mile, seven-night trek on the Jon Muir trail in the high Sierra Nevada mountains.

How did I get here?

I’m the model of a modern, domesticated husband and father. Admittedly, groomed for the finer and simpler things of life. Nevertheless, here I am.

Today, I’m mentally broken, dodging mosquitoes and longing for home. “Only” 20 more miles. “Only” two more nights. I miss my family terribly. I want my bed and a shower. An egg sandwich with coffee sounds delightful.

“But the only way home is the same way I got here—one step at a time.”

As I surrender my thoughts to the reality that there is no quick or easy way home, I can’t help but think about my son’s journey with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Every day, I watch my son tackle simple living tasks as if he were scaling a mountain. He has no easy way in this life; yet, he tackles every challenge without hesitation, taking one step at a time.

I’ve wanted to cry since the start of my hiking trip from mental fatigue and physical exhaustion, but tonight the tears finally roll down my face.

“Each tear confesses that what I have previously defined to be difficult as a 21st century man does not compare to what I am experiencing as I scale this earth and it certainly doesn’t compare to the challenges my son faces.”

As I reflect on my son’s steadfast and hard-earned strength, I am able to conjure the courage and perseverance to overcome my newfound brokenness. I can wipe away my tears and push on, knowing I am stronger because of my son.

Khrystal

Five tips for practicing
self-care

Self-care is essential, especially when you're a caregiver for a medically fragile child. Just as you stop to fill your vehicle's tank on long trips, you must also replenish your energy through self-care.

“If you don't, you'll end up empty, just as your car does.”

Here are five tips I've learned to help me practice self-care in the more than eight years I've cared for our medically fragile SMA Type 1 son, Hunter.

  1. When you practice self-care, you're helping to ensure you can care for others. If you've ever flown on a plane, you know you must put on your oxygen mask before you put on your child's. Why? Because if your child needs you to put their mask on in the first place, they might require you to put it on again. Should you fail to put yours on first, you run the risk of losing consciousness, and couldn't help if your child needed your assistance again. The same is true for self-care.
“It's not selfish to take care of yourself.”
  1. Choose goals and activities that you enjoy, and are important to you for your self-care. Describe your goals with specificity, so they're clearly defined. For example, "I'm going to run half a mile every day for two weeks." The more specific a goal is, the more you know what you need to do to meet it and can feel accomplished when you do. Start with one to three goals and add new ones as you meet them.
  2. Take time to make time for your goals. Set your goals and try to schedule them for the same time each day. It also helps to plan time for your goals as early as possible in the day. This way, you are more likely to complete them, and before long, you will establish a routine.
  3. Make sure your goals are attainable. My long-term goal might be to run a 10K, but I'm not going to start with that as a scheduled goal. Instead, I'm going to set step-goals. After meeting my goal of running a half-mile each day for two weeks, I would increase my goal to running three-quarters of a mile each day and would keep making incremental adjustments. By doing this, I could celebrate several achievements along the way.
  4. Meet weekly with an accountability partner. Choose someone who can make time to discuss your goals with you each week; it helps to stick to the same day and time, if possible. Try to choose an accountability partner with different goals, so that you can celebrate one another's wins without losing spirit if one of you falls short of reaching a goal. In the first week, discuss your goals and how you will meet them. In subsequent weeks, discuss how you did with your goals, what you could do differently the next week to reach a goal that eluded you, and any new goals.

I hope you find these tips helpful in practicing caregiver self-care and wish you success in meeting your goals.

Kevan

Three tips for your next trip

Traveling is a feat for anyone. Now, throw in a disability – throw in caregivers, equipment, terrain issues – and you have another beast altogether.

“Here are three quick tips for putting together your next trip...”
  1. Intentionality: Traveling is fun, but there is a level of responsibility to keep in mind. As you choose places to go, how to get there and who to go with, be wise. Consider options, challenges and dynamics. Take time hashing it out with your team to develop the best experience possible.
  2. Simplicity: Some concerns are valid, but travel is not your everyday routine, so don’t treat it that way. What in your everyday routine can look differently for a few days? There will be enough to take in and keep up with while traveling without also worrying about what’s not absolutely necessary.
  3. Flexibility: For all your planning, keep a loose grip on what it looks like. There will come unexpected change, unforeseen obstacles and blessings alike. Be ready to rethink plans and go with the flow. This is so integral to the adventure experience and I’d hate for you to miss it.
“These three tips are – ironically enough – applicable to any traveler, regardless of 'handicapability.'”

When planning a trip, everyone needs to be intentional, simple and flexible. But when disabilities are involved, the stakes are higher, room for error is slimmer and the need for clarity in these three categories is more paramount. Prepare wisely, consider humbly, develop loosely and, most importantly, have fun!

Brianna

When your caregiver is your
dad and your best friend

My dad and I can talk without talking. All I have to do is grunt, or quirk a brow, or wrinkle my nose, and my dad is on his merry way. We often joke that we have spent too much time together. If we can read each other’s mind, something’s got to give, if only to preserve our sanity.

“My dad is my best friend.
But he is also my caregiver.”

I live in his house. I eat his food and am responsible for probably 50 percent of our household’s electricity bill. Approximately three times a night, he drags himself out of bed to adjust me in my bed. Sometimes he gives me, his grown daughter, a shower.

Our situation is complex, to say the least. It’s infuriating, but also life-giving, and is a relationship that defies categorization. How do you explain to your therapist that, yes, your dad drives you out of your mind, but he is also one of the few things keeping you alive?

Boundaries are a buzzword these days – interpersonal rules, limits or guidelines that keep relationships healthy. Without boundaries, you’re a dog with no leash, digging under fences and crossing roads at peak traffic times. Without boundaries, you will either burn out or get hurt.

Boundaries are crucial in caregiving relationships, especially when your caregiver plays a dual role. Imagine if your best friend from high school was also your professional caregiver. What would you do if they didn’t show up for work one morning? As their friend, you might be tempted to let it slide. But as their “employer,” you expect them to be accountable, dependable, like any other employee. In this scenario, boundaries would delineate what is and is not acceptable. You might say, “I value your friendship, but I expect you to take responsibility for your actions and treat this like any other paying job.”

Now imagine that your best friend and caregiver is also your dad. How do you navigate that conversation?

It’s not easy. I won’t pretend that I’m an expert. But it helps to acknowledge that boundaries are hard, no matter the situation. It will always feel a little bit uncomfortable, like you’re overstepping in some necessary way.

I always seem to have boundary conversations around our dining table. My feet are in my mom’s lap, my dad is sitting to my left, and I’m staring at a half-empty plate of chicken and mashed potatoes. If history is anything to go by, I’m crying and feeling stuck between adolescence and adulthood because I need my parents more than most people my age.

I leave these conversations feeling wretched. My parents are my best friends. We’re closer than we probably should be. The last thing I want to do is complicate our lives by drawing a line in the sand and saying, “I’m still your daughter, but I’m also an adult. We need to work together, so I can start acting like one.”

“It takes vulnerability to ask for what you need and courage to believe in your ability to compromise.”

But I can say from experience that parents need boundaries, too. Starting the conversation is hard but worth it. Ultimately, you all benefit.

Alex

How did you do it?

I get asked this question from almost everyone when they find out I left my home in the suburbs to attend college six hours away from my family.

“To me, it wasn’t a huge obstacle to attend college with a disability—it was my goal that I was going to accomplish.”

For the disability community, going away to college can seem daunting and out of reach. Everyone is different and should do what is best for their situation. But, if you want to go away to college, I’m here to tell you how I did it and some of my own personal tips and tricks!

  • Tip 1: Research your desired college and look into what sort of disability support they offer. Call the college and talk with the disability resource center about your needs and how they can accommodate you, so you can get the full college experience, both academically and socially. Ask about accessibility, if they provide any personal care support and what academic modifications can be made for your learning needs.
  • Tip 2: Get ready for a lot of responsibility. If you decide to go away for college, you won’t have your family there. You’re going to have to manage your daily care, academics, accommodations, doctor appointments, social life, clubs, etc. I suggest getting a planner and getting yourself organized! Possibly adopt a routine so that you can keep your life organized and running smoothly. In college, there’s a lot going on, and you don’t want to get caught in a rut!
  • Tip 3: Communication skills are key! When you have a disability, having good communication skills are essential, especially in regards to managing your needs and care. Be open with your caregivers about how they can best help you thrive and be comfortable while you’re adjusting to life away from home. Be open with your professors about what your needs are while you are in their classroom. Be open with your peers about your needs, and just have fun!

Having the opportunity and privilege to attend college at the Southern Illinois University Carbondale and graduating with a B.S. in rehabilitation counseling changed my life. Not so much the degree, but the experience as a whole. I made forever friends and have made some of the best memories I’ve ever had in my life. Most importantly, I found myself. I learned that I could be successful and live completely on my own.

“Having the autonomy to do that gave me confidence, dignity and passion that led me to where I am today—living a happy and successful life.”

You can do it too, and I hope my tips and tricks help you realize, you can.

Amanda & Jeremy

Supporting siblings:
our personal tips

As a parent, I have finite time to nurture my children. This is true regardless of having a disabled son, who naturally requires more of my time for his physical and medical needs.

“How I nurture each child in my finite time matters; that’s why being intentional is so important.”

It’s difficult to give each child individualized attention when they are often together, but I find expressing my attention in small ways makes a big difference. My middle daughter loves to hold my hand. Even when I’m with all my children, if I ask to hold her hand, she can sense my attention and love directed specifically to her. Although subtle, my simple intentional action is noticed in her little heart.

Individual time for each child is sacred, so the time deserves to be called something special. When I’m out with one of my daughters, I call it a “mommy-daughter date.” Highlighting the one-on-one time with a special name helps my daughter recognize the dedicated time just for her. Even if the time together is short, the impact is eternal in my daughter’s heart.

It’s important that my daughters recognize that their brother also needs to be nurtured and have quality time, beyond what’s necessary for his medical care. Just like them, he gets “mommy-son dates” too. Just like them, there are specific ways I intentionally express attention and love to him.

Being intentional helps me nurture well, regardless of who needs more of my time.

“Sometimes it’s just as simple as quality versus quantity. Giving my best in the little time I have with each of them.”

Khrystal

Advocacy evolved: becoming
your child's best advocate

I’m Khrystal K. Davis, mom of five, including Hunter, who is eight years old with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) Type 1. I participate in SMA My Way because I believe it’s important to be an empowered advocate as an SMA patient or parent.

“My advocacy for Hunter started at his birth.”

Hunter was delivered via a C-section at 36 weeks. A medical team of 12 filled the operating room. All went well, and Hunter and I went to the recovery room with a nurse, my husband and my mom, who is also a nurse.

Hunter’s health rapidly deteriorated in the recovery room. He began to grunt each time he exhaled. Hunter was my fourth baby, so I knew this wasn’t normal. I asked the nurse to observe, but she didn’t seem concerned. Still, I knew something was wrong. I asked my mom, and she tried to assure me, “I’m sure everything will be okay.” The look on her face was far less reassuring than the words she spoke, and she left the room.

My mom returned, and a medical team from the NICU rushed into the room behind her. They quickly whisked Hunter away to the NICU. His condition continued to worsen, and he required intubation for respiratory failure.

I had to learn to advocate for Hunter from the beginning, but the type of advocacy evolved following his SMA diagnosis at eight weeks of age. I focused my efforts on getting Hunter an appointment with an SMA pulmonologist, an expert and asset in the SMA community, and medical equipment to help maintain his respiratory health. The SMA pulmonologist changed everything for Hunter—we now had a team advocating for him. I learned how to navigate as the captain of that team.

His specialist referred Hunter to speech, physical and occupational therapists, and they too became part of Hunter’s advocacy team. He enjoyed and flourished in his therapy sessions. Together, we secured braces, positioning seats and wheelchairs. Unfortunately, access to what Hunter needed wasn’t guaranteed, and we frequently received insurance denials. The online SMA community was instrumental in helping us overcome the denials. Other parents provided examples of what they’d done, and I modified those documents to address Hunter and his needs. I also began to anticipate potential questions and concerns and started addressing them proactively, rather than reactively. It was great, because I didn’t have to reinvent the wheel each time to help Hunter get what he needed.

I never anticipated the extent to which I would need to advocate for Hunter. Others in the SMA community paved the path to advocacy for me and knew the obstacles we would face. I listened, learned and adjusted my advocacy as needed.

“Becoming Hunter’s best advocate was a collaborative effort and I’m grateful to the SMA community for helping.”

My tip: Look for people who are empathetic to help you get what you need for your child. When someone tells you no or demonstrates an unwillingness to help, move on to another individual. Instead of trying to change a person’s mind, look for the right person to help.

Kevan

Fostering independence
in your children (part 1)

My sister and I grew up in an amazing home. We have an older brother and a mom and dad who, my mentor would say, “forgot to tell us we were handicapped.”

“We both have SMA Type 2, but our
lives have been full and wonderful.”

Looking back now, I can attribute that to the choices our parents made to foster within us senses of worth, awareness and ingenuity. When I asked mom and dad about these choices, they shared with me some keys to their methods of raising kids with disabilities. Here are a few tips from their perspective:

  1. Not All Danger Is Bad: Adventure is life-giving to kids. Scraped knees and broken arms teach them not only their limitations, but their abilities too. For a child with weak lungs, feeble limbs, or a wheelchair, this will look different from other kids. My brother climbed a tree and jumped in an attempt to fly. I couldn’t do that, but I could circle the roller rink with thirty other people a lot bigger and faster than me, and I could play soccer with my running friends on a bumpy Carolina field. There are foolish dangers, like driving your chair into a pond, and then there are dangers that come naturally with living life to the fullest. The latter should be allowed, and as parents, you will need to accept that your child might get hurt but they’ll grow as a person and ultimately be the better for it.
  2. Let Them Feel Deeply: Growing up is hard in its own right, but then compounding it with a disability makes for a childhood of unbelievable dynamics that many able-bodied adults may never face. Special friendships and broken hearts, cool gadgets and surprise surgeries. It’s a lot to take in. Kids have a profound capacity to feel. They should learn how, and be allowed, to handle those ocean waves of joy, sorrow, love, anger, confusion, etc. As they encounter the world around them, the good and the bad of it, their hearts are tender to the impression it makes. Don’t shelter them from this, but come alongside to help them step into these thoughts and feelings, and navigate such experiences properly to come out on the other end with a healthier, fuller spirit.
  3. Rebellion Is Not Their Disability: Discipline is important for a child learning how to interact with the world. It clarifies boundaries, which at an early age we test to understand. I learned early on that I can’t backtalk my mom or disobey my dad. I’m in a wheelchair, which means I am an exception to some rules, like extended time on exams or having someone else do my laundry, but I’m not exempt from respecting my fellow man and observing the law of the land.

So much of who we grow up to be is derived from the people who raise us, the world they shape around us, and the ways they help us navigate through that world.

“It’s those daily decisions to be present in the good and bad, and to nurture in your child, by example, the depths and value of life, regardless of disabilities.”

My tip: Look for people who are empathetic to help you get what you need for your child. When someone tells you no or demonstrates an unwillingness to help, move on to another individual. Instead of trying to change a person’s mind, look for the right person to help.

Kevan

Fostering independence
in your children (part 2)

Raising children with disabilities looks an awful lot like raising able-bodied children. At least, it can with the right tools and mindset. My parents raised three children, and two of us have SMA Type 2. They made important decisions daily to help navigate our interactions with the world around us.

“By this, we grew up learning how to have rich experiences with our communities and each other.”

In follow-up to my previous article, here are a few more tips from my mom and dad sharing their perspective on how they raised children with disabilities.

  1. Open Door Policies: An open heart is vital for you and your child to survive. Get your family out into the community and have people in your home, too. This breaks down the walls that come up when people don’t understand your family’s circumstances. Letting people into your world can hurt, but it can also be rewarding in the most beautiful ways you wouldn’t expect. We were not meant to carry burdens on our own, nor to celebrate without a party. This will help you to have support, and it will help your child to experience community, how to foster and engage it alike, which will prove invaluable as they set out on their own later in life.
  2. Relatable Moral Support: Not only is it important to assimilate your family into everyday community experiences, but on top of that, find a few other families with comparable challenges to your own. This will help you, your spouse and children all feel a better sense that you’re not alone in this different kind of life. Interacting with the outside world is paramount, but you also just need, sometimes, to hear someone say, “I get it.”
  3. There’s Always Another Way: As your family runs into obstacles, take advantage of these opportunities to foster innovation, creativity, and flexibility by example. I heard a story recently of a family who uses this motto, “There’s always another way!” If you and your family have dreams that seem impossible, work together and think outside the box to find a way. Traveling, picnicking, camping, whatever it may be, it will be encouraging to you, your children, and those around you to accomplish it in your own unique way. And it may be difficult, or take a lot of time and trial and error, but your family is worth figuring it out for, aren’t they? Growing up, my family found the wildest solutions to the weirdest dreams, and now as an adult, I travel the world in a backpack carried by my friends!
“Your choices now as a parent will help
shape who your child grows up to be.”

Do you want them to be free, to have friends, see the world, be a writer, lawyer, scientist, spouse, parent, contribute to society, change the world? At the end of the day, the most important thing is for them to know you love them, and these steps can help in the details of what that looks like.

Shane & Hannah

Home sweet home

During our speaking engagements at elementary schools across the country, a common question we get asked by inquisitive, young minds is: “What do you do if your house has steps?”

“We love this question, because it shows that the students are applying our message about accessibility to a centerpiece of their own lives, the house they live in.”

We don’t need to belabor an obvious fact – accessible housing is rare and difficult to find – but as Hannah and I have just purchased our first home together, we wanted to discuss a few of our observations (and tips!) from throughout this experience.

A frustrating part for me was that I couldn’t accompany Hannah to many of the open houses, due to inaccessibility. We entered the home-buying process with the assumption that at least some adaptations would need to be made to make our future home accessible, so we didn’t limit ourselves by only seeing perfectly accessible houses. The unfortunate effect of this decision was that we looked at many places with 3+ steps at every entrance.

We counteracted this issue in several ways. Sometimes, Hannah would attend the showing by herself (or with her mom!). Hannah made sure to take lots of photos and videos so she could share them with me afterwards. Another option was to have our real estate agent do a “virtual” tour for us. Using a video call on his phone, our agent walked through every room while we watched from the comfort of our apartment. With his video tour and his tips about the pros and cons of every room, it was just like doing an open house in person.

If possible, I’d also bring along my portable ramp to get inside as many of the prospective homes as I could. I enjoyed this method the best, but all three options gave us a great sense of our choices.

With a disease like SMA, requirements for a home are obviously going to vary from person to person, but here are some of the things we asked about and paid attention to when picking our first home:

  • How much work needs to be done to make the front entrance accessible?
  • If there’s a basement, is it a walkout or would we need to install an elevator/lift inside the home?
  • We generally looked only at one-level homes. Multiple floors just mean a lot more work needs to be done to make it accessible.
  • Were the rooms and doorways spacious enough to maneuver my wheelchair easily? In our first apartment, the hallway to our bedroom was so narrow that I scraped the doorway pretty much every time I entered it, which created a lovely, shrill screeching sound. Sorry neighbors!
  • Since Hannah lifts me onto the toilet and into the shower right now, we paid close attention to the layout of the bathroom.
  • An attached garage was pretty much a necessity for us, living in Minnesota where it snows 11 months of the years (at least it feels like). In the home that we eventually purchased, I can drive from inside our house into the garage and right into our van without ever going outside. In no small way, this feature is helping to keep me healthy, as I no longer need to spend time in the frigid cold/ice/snow getting into my van.
  • Does it have a fireplace? This one has nothing to do with accessibility. I just really wanted a fireplace.
“Buying a home is a stressful process for everyone. We did our best to have fun with it, and to remind ourselves that – stressful as it may have been – it was also exciting!”

Alex

You are worth it

Finding your voice when you live in a world that tries to speak for you can be tricky. It took me years of life experience to realize I could use my voice to express my feelings as a disabled teen / adult living with SMA to cultivate understanding and friendships. When I found that voice, I never looked back.

I think everyone would be surprised to know that I wasn’t always as outspoken as I am now. Don’t get me wrong … I’ve always been a feisty and passionate person, but I didn’t start really expressing my feelings about my disability until I started publicly sharing my life on social media.

My strategy for creating a supportive environment when I was a teen versus now is vastly different. I think the main difference can be summed up in one thing we all (mostly) gain as we age: maturity.

My teen self was always in survival mode. Growing up with a disability is the most challenging thing I’ve ever experienced. We’re all just trying to fit in, be cool, and express our inner pent-up teen hormonal imbalances, which is just as complicated as it sounds. With that being said, I cultivated my own sense of inclusion and social life by letting my personality shine. I focused a lot on my hair, makeup, and fashion as well — because that’s what other teens could relate to. I was also a rebel. I found solace in my newly acquired disabled rebel high schooler status. When have you ever heard of that, a disabled rebel? I took pleasure in breaking stereotypes and expectations people had of me because I have SMA.

“My friends and I bonded because they saw me as something unexpected: a teen just trying to fit in like everyone else.”

Teen logic is quite interesting. Let’s break it down: disabled me + skipping class + wearing a rebel outfit = friends. Don’t ask… that’s just the way it works… or how it worked for me.

When meeting someone new, I do carry some of my teen strategies along in my “educate an abled” handbag whenever I need to break those out. A little swear word or winged eyeliner goes a long way with creating a socially accepting environment, believe it or not.

I still use fashion and makeup to let my inner personality shine on the outside. However, now that I’m an adult, I find that talking about internalized ableism and my disability with my support network makes me feel like those things matter. It also makes my support network more in tune with my experiences as a disabled adult, which helps them be able to support me that much more. I’m not as shy when talking about why I eat slower or why I douse my chicken nuggets in ranch so they can slide down my weak SMA throat easier. Those are things I would try to hide as a teen, to make my disability more palatable for others.

The abled-gaze (how able-bodied people view disability) is something I tried to appeal to my entire life. I tried to come off as less SMA than I really am. By doing that I was only hurting myself and distancing myself from who I am which made it hard to create a supportive network.

“By being who you truly are you let the people in your life one step closer to knowing how to support you best.”

Don’t try and become more palatable to please people around you. Being you is so much more freeing.

Brianna

Finding my identity in stories

I can’t remember when I realized that, more than anything, I wanted to be a writer. Like most things, it dawned slowly. As a child, I loved stories. My dad and I spent hours in an oversized, weathered rocker, with dark blue fabric that felt somewhat like a cross between velvet and corduroy. We lost entire days to reading about different people and different worlds.

I now know that stories were a refuge to my eight-year-old self. She found something in stories that she couldn’t find in the real world. First, it was the sprawling hills of a childhood favorite. Then it was the adventure and thrill of finding a long-lost repository of gold and knowledge. Then it was the wonder of space.

The psychoanalyst in me realizes that, as a young, disabled girl, part of me was yearning for another life. A different one, with a body that worked right, a body that wasn’t constantly trying to sabotage itself. But the counselor in me knows that, really, it wasn’t that I wanted to escape my reality.

It was that I wanted to see myself in theirs.

I was a writer in a world that denied me my own existence. There were no disabled girls in my Saturday morning cartoons. There were no disabled girls on the big screen, fighting the bad guys for the greater good. There were no disabled girls in the background of adventure movies and cult classics. There were no disabled girls in princess movies, even when media executives went out of their way to show that, look, anyone can be a princess! Yes, even you!

“It’s hard to find your passion in a world that tries to erase you. It’s hard to find your passion when, most of the time, disabled people are relegated to hospitals and living rooms.”

We don’t go to prom. The Force isn’t with us. And we certainly don’t steal significant historical documents.

But that’s a narrative. And a false one at that. Disabled girls are everywhere. We go to concerts and poetry readings and midnight premieres. We climb mountains and write papers and sometimes, if we’re really, really lucky, we find someone who will take our wild dreams in stride—even the ones that have to do with significant historical documents. We fall in love. We have families. We stare at the sky and feel, for one blinding moment, that we, too, are made of stardust. We rage and cry and, at the end of the day, we pick ourselves up and do it all over again.

“The world tries to convince us that, no matter how loud we scream, our stories are swallowed by the void. But that’s a narrative. And a false one at that.”

Someone is listening. Someone needs your poem, or your app, or even just your laugh. The real challenge is convincing yourself that, just like everyone else, you deserve the world, and whatever lies beyond.

From one disabled girl to another? You do.

Amanda & Jeremy

Navigating life as an
interabled family

We navigate life as an interabled family in a moment-by-moment way.

“As parents, we recognize our limitations and that sometimes we can’t do it all, so we don’t try.”

We do what we can, when we can; but, more often than not, we choose fewer activities and fewer people. This forces us to be deliberate and be intentional with whom and how we spend our time.

We spend time with people who recognize our life runs at a different pace. People who consider accommodations so our disabled son, Asher, can be included in activities. People who are willing to help when things are hard. These are the people who won’t be bothered by coming to our house instead of a park when it’s the best accessible option. These are the people who will swing by on a moment’s notice to pick up our daughters, so they are not stuck at home when their brother is sick. These are the people who understand we can’t always do it on our own, and they are willing to be our village.

Our family ebbs and flows based on Asher’s health. When he is doing well, we are full steam ahead. This is when we register the children for a special activity in the community, we take a spontaneous family trip or we try something new. When Asher gets sick, everything slows down, sometimes to a standstill. We try to divide and conquer when possible to maintain activities for our daughters, but at the same time, we’ve learned that slowing down is a team effort, and as a family, we are in it together.

Activities often require a delicate balancing act. Asher usually needs modifications or extra assistance to participate in activities. Many times, his sisters want to do things that their brother can’t do. In spite of these challenges, we often celebrate our parental victories when we make the impossible possible. But there are times we help our children understand our limitations or their limitations literally make some things impossible to do. Limitations are hard for children to accept, but it helps to reframe their mindset to think about all the times and ways they have and will push past the immediate limitation.

“As parents, we accept that it’s okay to teach our children that they can’t always do everything and yes, in fact, “no” is an answer.”

It’s not always easy to tell how our children are navigating through our interabled family life. We catch glimpses that show us they are doing just fine. Like the moment at a friend’s house when Asher’s sister pushes chairs out of the way to make room for his wheelchair. Or the moment Asher celebrates his sister’s accomplishment for something that he will never be able to do himself. These moments help our hearts rest a little easier. But it’s when we are sitting around the dinner table telling jokes or snuggled up in bed watching a family movie that we know the simplest and sweetest moments are the keys to their hearts – no matter what life they are navigating.

Alex

Different is not ugly

Picture someone wrapping you in yellow caution tape, but the tape didn’t just say “CAUTION” in big bold letters – it was followed by “DISABILITY IS UGLY.”

“Growing up, I let that statement take control of how I viewed my body.”

This conditioned and toxic way of thinking was the mental space where my body image existed, although I never told anybody that. Why would I? There was nothing I could do to “fix” my body. I couldn’t go to the gym and sprout abs after having a protruded SMA belly. I couldn’t tone my atrophied arms and legs. There was no use in discussing it because my fate was to inevitably succumb to the fact that my body wasn’t appealing and never would be.

These sentiments were reinforced by the media and lack of representation of disabled bodies portrayed in a sexy way, anywhere. I’ve been taught to think that my body is broken and doesn’t work. I’ve been taught that I need to be fixed. I’ve been taught that my body curves in ways it shouldn’t, which means it inherently isn’t sexy. I’ve been taught that disability isn’t sexy because I’ve never seen a disabled person in a lingerie ad or in a teen heartthrob-type movie. The only way I ever saw disability portrayed in the media was as inspirational – the type of inspirational that only exists to soothe able-bodied people’s insecurities about themselves. Essentially, using disability as a vehicle to make themselves feel better at our expense. Gross. But, that all shifted as I started searching for answers.

When I decided to start sharing my story on social media, it consisted of my basic life narrative – showcasing how I live with SMA by showing people that my life might look a little different, but I’m still a human being just like everyone else. Looking back, it started out very natural and innocent. As I started diving into self-advocacy and hearing from other disabled activists on a myriad of different topics, one caught my eye and changed my life.

What I saw hit me like a ton of bricks. But not in a bad way – more in an “oh my God, where has this been all my life?” way. It was a post that included a picture of a disabled person in their underwear, owning their disabled body in a way I had never seen before. I knew I had to find out more. I read their post, along with their photo, and felt each little hair on my arm stand up as my mind started racing. They talked about how disabled bodies deserve to be represented in a sexy way and that they are NOT broken. They are whole… they don’t need to be fixed to be seen as sexy, because “pretty” and “ugly” are not real. They’re ideas that we are taught.

“Surely, we can retrain our minds to sustain this way of thinking so we can stop hating our bodies.”

That’s what I began doing, one sexy disabled body photo at a time. I posted these photos with a newfound respect and love for my disabled curves that weren’t ugly, like I had always thought. They were unique – just like everyone else’s body.

I made it my mission to teach all my followers my life-changing revelation: different is not ugly.

Shane & Hannah

Saying goodbye to sorry

Many of us living with SMA can identify with a recurring pattern of thought that I have named my “Burden Complex.” It’s an idea that I’ve written about at length, but I believe it’s such a common part of growing up with SMA that it’s worth mentioning again.

“My Burden Complex was simple: growing up, from the ages of about 10 to 25, there were times when asking for help from others created a feeling of immense guilt within me.”

I felt like I was bothering people. I felt like I needed to minimize my needs in order to be less of a burden to my loved ones around me. It wasn’t a constant feeling, but it was certainly hard to deal with when it did arise. These challenging emotions caused me to repeat a similar phrase when asking for help, “I’m sorry, but…”

“I’m sorry, but could I have another sip of my drink?”

“I’m sorry, but could I use the bathroom?”

My apologies were often met with the same reaction. My loved ones or friends would say, “You don’t need to be sorry, I’m happy to help!” Still, this constant reassurance did very little to alleviate my burdensome feelings.

It wasn’t until I met (and fell madly in love with) my fiancée, Hannah, that I was able to truly say goodbye to saying sorry. With a seemingly simple question, Hannah helped me better understand my Burden Complex, and thus, move on from it.

The conversation went something like this…

“Hey Hannah, sorry but can you grab me a snack?”

“Sure, my handsome and intelligent and funny Shane, but you don’t need to apologize. You know I love helping you.”

“I know, but what if you’re just saying that because it would be mean not to say it?” (This was a classic way that my Burden Complex would negate the reassurances from others.)

“Do you enjoy being my boyfriend?”

“What? Yes, obviously.”

“But what if you’re just saying that to be nice?”

“Of course I’m not! I love you!”

“Do you see how that feels? To be questioned about something that you obviously mean whole-heartedly?”

“And just like that, it clicked. I would never lie to Hannah about my feelings towards her, so why would I question her reassurances about my Burden Complex?”

This is obviously a simplification of a healing process that takes time. Even today, I have moments where I catch myself thinking of myself as a burden. But by stopping myself from apologizing for every request and reminding myself that loved ones have no reason to lie about their willingness to help me, I’ve made great progress in seeing myself and my needs in a healthier way.

Alex

Catching SMA curveballs

In life, bad days are inevitable.

When you live with SMA, just getting through the day can feel like an impossible task. Sometimes, just eating and watching a movie are my only accomplishments of the day, and that’s okay.

We have all this pressure on us to accomplish and “achieve” things in an unrealistic timeframe that doesn’t acknowledge everyone’s unique lives. Everyone should live their life at a pace that’s suitable to their specific needs, goals and aspirations. Even if we do that and respect our boundaries and disability fatigue — SMA can throw a lot of other unexpected curveballs our way, and I’m no stranger to the curveballs of SMA.

There’s unexpected sickness that can stop your life right in the middle of the train tracks. There’s the back and forth to try to get a new wheelchair or medical equipment approved. There are social aspects, like combating ableism all while trying to balance having a healthy social life. There’s internalized ableism and mental health you need to manage. Sometimes, it can all seem very daunting.

Having lived for 26 years and counting, I learned how to catch those curveballs.

“Catching SMA curveballs is like rock climbing.”

I know this metaphor example uses rock climbing and I can’t walk, which makes for the perfect amount of irony, so stick with me.

When you rock climb, it can be really scary at first and the unknown is waiting for you at the top. You might slip and fall on your journey to the top — you might even scrape your knee. But you get up and try again, even if you fall down multiple times. You must keep going. Finally, the moment is here, the part where you reach the top. You remember each step and how much anguish you were in as you took those last few steps to get to the top.

You stand (or sit) at the top… your long hard journey has brought you here and the view is great. You feel the sun shine on your face and remember that the journey of life isn’t always easy, but it’s always worth it in the end.

“That’s how I get through hard days living with SMA — being able to look back on my journey and appreciate all the moments in between because nothing good in life ever comes easy.”

Kevan

Debunking myths around socializing with a disability

When I’m not traveling, I spend most of my days at my local coffee shop in downtown Fort Wayne, Indiana. Sometimes, it’s bursting at the seams with patrons coming and going and sometimes, I’m the only person there besides the baristas. Over the past six years, I’ve met writers and artists, lawyers, priests, corporate moguls, politicians and touring bands who haven’t showered in three weeks. I’ve met college kids, homeless people, delivery guys, blue collars and nine-to-fivers.

“All the while, I’m the same ol’ Kevan they meet, with SMA and an insatiable love for being with people.”

I get to see the various ways people respond to me socially, and how I respond to them; I get to witness firsthand the many myths about being social with a disability, both externally and internally; and I get to experience the intensive work and immense joy of debunking those various myths. I want to focus, in this article, on two myths in particular, and clarify that these two myths are the result of expectations—and thereby, the mutual responsibilities—of our able-bodied and disabled communities alike.

  1. “All of my friends should help me.” Having a disability is tricky because you have unusually practical needs, they need to be met, and that’s just life. You’re so used to having these needs that finding ways to fulfill them is second nature to you by now. So, why shouldn’t it be second nature to all of your friends, too? A myth that folks with disabilities often fall prey to is that everyone in your life should participate in helping with those needs. And I see how we get there. It makes sense if that’s your everyday life. It’s my everyday life. Folks on the able-bodied side of this conversation fall prey to it, too, and run away at that ominous mountain of expectation. Can you blame them?
  2. “None of my friends should help me.” There’s another end to this issue, which is the assumption that no one can help you, should help you, or even wants to help you. Personal care, food prep, doors and jackets; all of that is your nurse’s job or your parents’ responsibility. Friends are friends, and we expect them to be there just to laugh and watch movies with. What a miserable myth to live under, though. And when this is your mindset, no one knows your needs, so then they assume there’s nothing for them to help with. The relationship remains shallow, stagnant, and unsatisfying for everyone involved.

Rich social experiences come from balancing vulnerability and awareness. Some friends will be closer than others, some will help in ways others won’t, some won’t physically help at all and that’s just fine. Make your needs known tastefully and sensibly as they arise and as those around you seem willing (qualification is another myth we can address later).

“The key is to see people—truly see them—and let the value of your relationship be deeper than whether or not they help you with your wedgie.”

Brianna

Hunger, desire, and
learning to be alive

It took me years to realize that I struggled with mental health.

Looking back, I feel like it should’ve been obvious. There’s anxiety, and then there’s gasping for breath in a waiting room because your doctor mentioned surgery and you’re having trauma flashbacks of anesthesia and bloodwork and life-threatening operations. There’s depression, and then there’s sleeping till 4 p.m., playing video games till 7 a.m., losing entire years to the black pit in your brain.

“There are bad days, and then there’s living with a disability.”

Things changed for the better when I realized, quite suddenly, that I wasn’t just nervous, or sad, going through a tough time. I was anxious. I was depressed. I spent the first 15 years of my life waiting to die. When that didn’t happen, I didn’t know how to live. I didn’t know how to be a disabled person in a world that values the perfect body, with healthy lungs and straight teeth and a correctly shaped skull.

No wonder I was confused. No wonder I felt alone.

In my experience, things start to change when you acknowledge the truth of your situation. Sometimes, most times, the truth is ugly. Many of us are dependent, and lonely, and frustrated with our lives. We want more for ourselves, but we have been conditioned by society to ask for things we know we can get, like pity or discrimination. We don’t dare ask for the big, scary, marvelous things, like dreams or miracles.

Things start to change when you look the truth of yourself in the eye. You are an animal with hunger and desire. You want things—love, and recognition, and chocolate, maybe, if you’re anything like me. You want the world, and your want makes you human.

Humanity is hard to acknowledge. Especially when you grow up in a world that tells you through subliminal messaging and targeted ads that disabled bodies aren’t pretty, disabled people aren’t worthy, disabled _____ aren’t _____. (Fill in the blank. You might be surprised by what comes to mind.) Standing in front of this wide, wondrous world and asking for more, demanding it.

“I don’t blame you for shying away. But I am here to tell you that everything you’ve ever wanted is yours to have. You just need the courage to ask for it.”

People will turn you down. It’s inevitable. And, inevitably, their rejection will sting. But that is part of being human. That is part of being alive.

I could talk for hours about mental health. Meditation (try it), or acceptance and commitment therapy (my counseling framework of choice), or support groups (you never know until you show up). But I know from experience that, once I acknowledged all of the things I’d spent years pretending I didn’t want, life got better. Not because a magical switch was flipped, but because I allowed myself to be, for the first time in a long while, human, with hunger and desire.

I let myself be present.

Kevan

Five ways to make your
world more accessible

I grew up in North Carolina, where every road is long, every hill is steep, and nearly every house has stairs.

The church I grew up in had two levels, both accessible as long as you rounded the property outside. My elementary and middle schools were the same.

And there are ramps, automatic doors, sometimes elevators with buttons you can reach.

“Accommodations do exist, and are helpful, but what I find most effective is when my aim to achieve accessibility happens from the inside out.”

The following are five interpersonal ways to make your world more accessible.

  1. Community
    Having friends and family around you is paramount. A devoted care team to support you, whether two people or twenty, will afford you more freedom to live life without the stress of figuring it out on your own. Suddenly, there’s no need to ask whether there’s an automatic door or if the bus system is up to snuff. You don’t have to order food based solely on whether it needs to be cut up or worry if the handicap row in the movie theater will be available. The possibilities are endless when people work together.
  2. Flexibility
    I have a handful of guys who take turns coming to get me up in the morning. They are all volunteers, which is awesome, but they can do that because they have other jobs, so to enjoy their help, I need to be flexible with their schedules. Some arrive at 6:30 to get me up before work, others come at 9:30 because they worked late the night before.When making plans for my day, I keep it loose and fluid, free to fluctuate my own life according to the lives of those around me.
  3. Ingenuity
    Another aspect to flexibility is ingenuity, looking at an evolving situation and finding ways to change with it.One of my favorite memories with this is when my friends and I used to have a weekly potluck together. It always happened at a different person’s house, so I never knew what I would find by way of accessibility. But my friends and I assessed and worked it out. Sometimes that meant building ramps, sometimes it meant them carrying me in without my wheelchair, but it was always creative, fun, and successful.
  4. Simplicity
    Something I’ve learned and ended up loving is my need to simplify life. Over the years, I’ve become a bit of a minimalist because that means less for me (and thus my care team) to keep track of, physically and mentally, leaving room for what matters most. All my clothes, for example, match (and I don’t have a lot of them), so that whoever’s getting me up in the morning can just grab whatever from the closet.I already have enough legitimate needs to address, why add unnecessary details to the pile? It’s amazing to see how accessible the world becomes when you’re less demanding of it.
  5. Community
    Returning to community, it’s not just about your care team, but about your care for them as well.Relationships grow when both parties pour into it. While you have needs, so does everyone else around you, whether obvious or not. This is your chance to give back, and your care for others may build your community, both in numbers and depth, and thus as you work together, the world becomes more accessible for everyone involved.
“Accessibility, in the end, comes from folks putting others first and working together to find creative solutions. This involves thoughtfulness and sacrifice on both sides of the conversation. But the result is beautiful: a world physically more accessible, but also more loving.”

Brianna

Finding and loving
my voice

I was a self-conscious middle schooler when my English teacher asked me to read a short story I’d written at a school event.

I realized halfway through the reading that my audience was comprised of blank faces. No one understood what I had said. The story — something about siblings and ghosts and a tragic car accident — was lost in the glare of the spotlight.

It took me years to get over that incident. I found that, when people talked to me, I no longer had the words, so I stopped talking. I tripped and fell into silence.

But then I went to therapy and worked with a counselor to address my depression. And, perhaps the scariest of all, I told my story. Again, and again, until the memory grew blunt edges.

“With time, I grew to love my voice. There are days of silence and uncertainty and wishing my voice was different — but then I wake up and start again.”

If you’re struggling to find and accept your voice, here’s what I suggest:

  1. Explain your situation
    Nothing changed until I found people who were willing to listen.You might have to repeat yourself a few times, but don’t give up. People might surprise you.
  2. Troubleshoot
    I recently invested in a portable speaker with a microphone that attaches to my wheelchair. It helps to know I don’t have to shout.
  3. Push through the discomfort
    Will you be anxious? Without a doubt!Will people understand you? Maybe! Will it be awkward and uncomfortable? Probably!
“Will you survive anyway? Yes.”